chemistry

chemistry

Friday, 28 April 2017

Where do Edinburgh chemists and engineers get jobs? - find out from Linkedin

If I could get a job where "mucking about on Linkedin to put off doing the things on my to-do list" was the primary responsibility, I would be at the very top of the career ladder.

Linkedin's VERY useful though, for finding out where Edinburgh chemists and chemical engineers are working or have worked in the past, thus adding to your knowledge from our own DLHE destination data (both 1 year's worth  AND three years' worth). 

I found the following information by searching The University of Edinburgh Student & Alumni Database. If you have a Linkedin profile, you can search it. If you don't have a profile, it's high time you did!


Table 1.  Top 24 employers of University of Edinburgh chemistry graduates on Linkedin

Employer

No. employed
GSK
33
AstraZeneca
19
EY
13
Shell
13
University of Strathclyde
13
Diageo
13
PwC
12
Novartis
12
Imperial College London
12
Johnson Matthey
12
Pfizer
11
University of Glasgow
11
RBS
11
UCL
11
University of Oxford
11
Procter & Gamble
10
Almac Group
10
City of Edinburgh Council
10
Syngenta
10
Charles River Laboratories
10
University of Bath
10
BP
9
British Army
9
Accenture
8




Table 2. Top 24 employers of University of Edinburgh chemical engineering graduates on Linkedin

Employer
No. employed

BP
28
Shell
16
Wood Group
13
Diageo
12
ExxonMobil
11
Xodus Group
10
Maersk Oil
9
Atkins
9
GSK
8
ConocoPhillips
8
Jacobs
8
Procter & Gamble
7
EUSA
7
INEOS Grangemouth
7
INEOS
6
Amec Foster Wheeler
6
Genesis Oil and Gas Consultants
6
Total
5
EnQuest
5
Accenture
4
Unilever
4
Marathon Oil Corporation
4
Wood Mackenzie
3
Aspen Technology
3

Some caveats here;

1. The University of Edinburgh is a huge employer of its own graduates but it is automatically screened out of searches.
2. Since I searched the Student & Alumni database, EUSA is a common employer.
3. These are people who have a Linkedin profile - are they more likely to be working in a commercial environment, are they more likely to be using their degree directly - who knows?  I suspect your average public sector worker is less likely to have a profile.
4. The database spans graduations from 1900 onward. Restricting the search to the last 5 years would no doubt give a very different picture. For example, in Table 3 below, for Chemical Engineers of 2010-2017, fewer than half of the Top 24 are Oil & Gas related employers (compared to two-thirds from the open-date search depicted in Table 2). The newer kids on the block included John Crane, Reckitt Benckiser, BASF, North British Distillery Company, Intel Corporation, Petronas, Johnson & Johnson & Energika.


Table 3. Top 24 employers of University of Edinburgh chemical engineering graduates on Linkedin (who attended university 2010-2017)

Employer
No. employed
BP
13
Diageo
9
EUSA
7
Xodus Group
6
Atkins
6
Wood Group
6
Accenture
4
Shell
4
ExxonMobil
4
John Crane
3
GSK
3
BASF
3
Reckitt Benckiser
3
ConocoPhillips
3
Jacobs
3
Imperial College London
3
INEOS Grangemouth
3
Amec Foster Wheeler
3
North British Distillery Company Ltd.
2
PETRONAS
2
Intel Corporation
1
ENERGIKA SRL
1
The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson
1
Iowa State University
1



Thursday, 27 April 2017

Job titles OUT, Skill set IN

If you have no idea what job you want when you graduate, it really doesn't matter according to a recent BBC report. Forget about specific job titles like analytical chemist or process engineer,. Instead, think about the skills you want to use and the problems you want to solve and work upwards from there.

For example, you might say: I want to use my analytical skills + I am interested in renewable energy + I don't want to be an engineer. Sadly, it doesn't mean that a relevant job title will then suddenly drop from the sky, but it might mean that when you do see a range of jobs advertised, some of your mental boxes will get ticked. You can then open yourself up to a wider range of possibilities. This must be more fruitful than restricting yourself to one job title, such as Sustainability Associate in a well-known management consultancy.

This also opens up the notion of a portfolio career, which can be made up of several different jobs or disparate projects /micro-jobs with one employer. Positions like these will be more prevalent in the next decade. For example, both Cisco and MasterCard have “internal mobility platforms” that allow employees to cherry-pick projects to fill specific gaps for the company rather than staying in a more structured role. This happens in public service too - eg the Civil Service/Scottish Government actively encourage staff to rotate round different divisions every 2-5 years, and try out new roles to develop their potential.See BBC Next Generation article for more details

If you feel you would benefit from discussing this further, then book a careers appointment on MCH. Or, you could try out some of our interactive web-based programs to get you thinking about what you want for the future.